Boat Safety Requirements

Boat Safety Requirements
Last updated December 3rd, 2008

Maryland Equipment Checklist for boats 16′ to less than 26′
Maryland Equipment Checklist for boats 26′ to less than 40′
Maryland Equipment Checklist for boats 40′ to less than 65′
Types of Marine Sanitation Devices
Types of Personal Floatation Devices


Maryland Equipment Checklist: Boats 16′ – less than 26′

  • Boating Safety Education Certificate (for operators born on or after July 1, 1972)
  • Certificate of Number (except non-motorized vessels)
  • Validation decal displayed
  • PFD’s: Type I, II, III or V
  • PFD’s: Type IV (throwable)
  • Fire Extinguishers – (1) Type B-1
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor
  • Ventilation System
  • Muffler (inboard engines)
  • Whistle and bell w/clapper (bell size not less than 7.9″, based on diameter of the mouth)
  • Navigation Lights
  • Marine Sanitation Device – Installed toilets must have an operable MSD Type I, II, or III

Maryland Equipment Checklist: Boats 26′ – less than 40′

  • Boating Safety Education Certificate (for operators born on or after July 1, 1972)
  • Certificate of Number
  • Validation decal displayed
  • PFD’s: Type I, II, III or V
  • PFD’s: Type IV (throwable)
  • Fire Extinguishers – (1) B-II or (2) B-I. A fixed system equals (1) B-1
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor
  • Ventilation System
  • Muffler (inboard engines)
  • Whistle and bell w/clapper (bell size not less than 7.9″, based on diameter of the mouth)
  • Navigation Lights
  • Oil Pollution Placard
  • Garbage Placard
  • Marine Sanitation Device – Installed toilets must have an operable MSD Type I, II, or III
  • Navigation Rules

Maryland Equipment Checklist: Boats 40′ – less than 65′

  • Boating Safety Education Certificate (for operators born on or after July 1, 1972)
  • Certificate of Number
  • Validation decal displayed
  • PFD’s: Type I, II, III or V
  • PFD’s: Type IV (throwable)
  • Fire Extinguishers – (1) B-II and (1) B-I or (3) B-1. A fixed system equals (1) B-1
  • Backfire Flame Arrestor
  • Ventilation System
  • Muffler (inboard engines)
  • Whistle and bell w/clapper (bell size not less than 7.9″, based on diameter of the mouth)
  • Navigation Lights
  • Oil Pollution Placard
  • Garbage Placard
  • Marine Sanitation Device – Installed toilets must have an operable MSD Type I, II, or III
  • Navigation Rules

Marine Sanitation Devices

Type I and II MSDs

These types macerate the sewage and then treat it with chemicals or other means to reduce the bacterial count before it is discharged overboard.

A Type I MSD must macerate the sewage to no visible solids, and then reduce the bacteria count to less than 1,000 per 100 milliliters.

A Type II MSD macerates the sewage even finer so that the discharge contains no suspended particles and the bacteria count must be below 200 per 100 milliliters.

Type III MSD

Type III MSDs are holding tanks. This is the most common type of MSD found on boats. These systems are designed to retain or treat the waste until it can be disposed of at the proper shoreside facilities.

Portable toilets are the simplest type of MSDs. They represent the easiest solution to marine sanitation on small boats because they require minimal space, and are inexpensive, reliable and easy to operate.

From the perspective of environmental impact, a Type III MSD — when used correctly — may be best, because it conveys boat waste into a local advanced sewage treatment system and reduces the need for on-board use of potentially toxic tank treatment chemicals.


Types of Personal Flotation Devices

Type 1 PFDType I PFD

Off-Shore Life Jacket
Best for open, rough or remote water where rescue may be slow coming
Sizes
Two sizes fit most children and adults
Advantages
-Floats you the best
-Turns most unconscious wearers face-up in water
-Highly visible color
Disadvantages
-Bulky & uncomfortable


Type 2 PFDType 2 PFD

Near-Shore Buoyant Vest
Good for calm, inland water, or where there is a good chance of fast rescue
Sizes
Infant, child, youth and adult
Advantages
-Less bulky
-Turns some unconscious wearers face-up
-More comfortable than Type I PFD
Disadvantages
-Not for long hours in rough water
-Will not turn some unconscious wearers face-up


Type 3 PFDType 3 PFD

Flotation Aid
Good for calm, inland water, or where there is a good chance of fast rescue
Size
Many sizes from child/small through adult
Advantages
-Generally the most comfortable type
-Designed for activity marked on the device
-Available in many styles
Disadvantages
-May have to tilt head back to avoid face-down
-Wearer’s face may be covered by waves
-Not for extended survival in rough water


Type 4 PFDType 4 PFD

Throwable Device
For calm, inland water with heavy boat traffic, where helps is always nearby
Kinds
Rings, Horseshoe Buoys and Cushions
Advantages
-Can be thrown to someone
-Good back-up to wearable PFDs
-Some can be used as a seat cushion
Disadvantages
-Not for unconscious persons
-Not for non-swimmers or children
-Not for many hours in rough water


Type 5 PFDType 5 PFD

Special Use Devices
Only for special uses or conditions. Equal to either Type I, II, or III performance as noted on the label.
Varieties Include
Boardsailing vests, deck suits, work vest, hybrid PFDs & other
Advantages
-Made for specific activities
-Least bulky of all types
-High flotation when inflated
-Good for continuous wear
Disadvantages
-May not adequately float some wearers unless partially inflated
-Requires active use and care of inflation chamber
-Required to be worn to be counted as a regulation PFD